thehippiejew:

forsayingyes:

gqgqqt:

so this is a thing

a bunch of moms are making letters+audio recordings of affirming, validating letters to queer/trans* people who don’t get that kind of support from their moms

i would say more about it but

im kind of busy in this puddle of tears on the floor so

In case any of my followers don’t have this kind of support from home…

my mom did this and if you need an honourary mother i promise she would be happy to talk to you

(via sivol)

(Source: dead-dogma, via sivol)

(Source: caloriqe, via fragileminded)

enterprising-gentleman:

sapphirefiber:

paintedlandscape:

INFMETRY star projector.

I really genuinely want this.

Oh, this is cool, but I bet it’s one of those insanely expensive things I’ll never be able to have in a million years.

OHWAITLOOK IT’S $22 HOLY CRAP

Some assembly required, but it looks fun to assemble. AND THOSE RESULTS HOLY CRAP

Yep, added to my wishlist, for sure!

$22?!? I know what want for Christmas this year…

(via themajesticfloof)

airships-and-swords:

theracismrepellent:

go0fnugget:

During WWII, Japanese American soldiers were among the first to liberate the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany. “U.S military commanders decided it would be bad public relations if Jewish prisoners were freed by Japanese American soldiers whose own families were imprisoned in American concentration camps,” therefore, these Japanese American soldiers who liberated hundreds of Jews are missing in our history lessons.

Wow. 

See, that implies that our history lessons actually talk about the fact that our government put Japanese Americans IN camps - and that by our silence we LET them. We condoned it. That’s on the heads of every white person who stood silently by and said nothing.
Also, yeah, not regularly taught.

airships-and-swords:

theracismrepellent:

go0fnugget:

During WWII, Japanese American soldiers were among the first to liberate the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau, Germany. “U.S military commanders decided it would be bad public relations if Jewish prisoners were freed by Japanese American soldiers whose own families were imprisoned in American concentration camps,” therefore, these Japanese American soldiers who liberated hundreds of Jews are missing in our history lessons.

Wow. 

See, that implies that our history lessons actually talk about the fact that our government put Japanese Americans IN camps - and that by our silence we LET them. We condoned it. That’s on the heads of every white person who stood silently by and said nothing.

Also, yeah, not regularly taught.

(via sivol)

furything:

Black tourmaline and smokey quartz

furything:

Black tourmaline and smokey quartz

(Source: exoticcrystals.net, via sivol)

tastefullyoffensive:

Adulthood. [via]

tastefullyoffensive:

Adulthood. [via]

(via fuzzyanus)

masalamermaid:

timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.
Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]
The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.
It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.
It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.
White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.
Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.
People seriously need to learn some history.THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.


#god how do people seriously not know this


but forreal tho. being brown means your parent had to pull you aside before the WWII unit in school to explain to you that you werre going to see a lot of white people misusing and fearing the symbol that’s in your place of worship

masalamermaid:

timsaturday:

youarenotdesi:

M.I.A. shitting on ignorant opinions

This isn’t a Nazi Swastika what so ever, as a JEW I can recognize this unlike some people.

Gonna quote straight from wikipedia here.

It is a symbol among the ancient Celts, Indians, and Greeks,[2]as well as in later Buddhism,[4]Jainism,[5]Hinduism,[6][4]and Nazism,[3][4]among other cultures and religions.[4][2]

The word swastika derives from the Sanskrit root ssu(“Good”),asti(“to be”),[4][6]andka(making)[6]The older term gammadion cross derives from its appearance, which is identical to four Greek gamma letters affixed to each other.

What I find interesting is that this is actually a very very good representation of what can happen when white people culturally appropriate something.

The Swastika, long before the Nazis came about and started brandishing their own bastardization of it, had a strong religious and cultural significance to a LOT of people.

It didn’t represent anything evil, it didn’t represent a dictatorship that perpetuated one of the most well known genocides taught today.

It only started having this horrible association in the 1920’s when the Nazi party appropriated it as for their logo.

White people, white supremacists, taking something with an already well established past and meaning; and placing their own over it.

Because of these people, swastikas that do not have anything to do with the Nazi party are demonized in most people’s eyes because they don’t know any better, because white people wiped out it’s original meaning in white culture.

People seriously need to learn some history.
THIS is the sort of damage that cultural appropriation can do in the long run.

(via sivol)

artizan3:

original post by:
asylum-art.tumblr.com



A Single Thread Wrapped Around Thousands of Nails by Kumi Yamashita
Kumi Yamashita , whose mind-blowing shadow artworks have been featured before, uses a single, unbroken thread wrapped around thousands of nails to create stunning portraits of women and men.
In the ongoing series entitled Constellation (a nod to the Greek tradition of tracing mythical figures in the sky), the Japanese artist (living and working in New York) uses three simple materials to produce these otherworldly works of art.

artizan3:

original post by:

asylum-art.tumblr.com

A Single Thread Wrapped Around Thousands of Nails by Kumi Yamashita

Kumi Yamashita , whose mind-blowing shadow artworks have been featured before, uses a single, unbroken thread wrapped around thousands of nails to create stunning portraits of women and men.

In the ongoing series entitled Constellation (a nod to the Greek tradition of tracing mythical figures in the sky), the Japanese artist (living and working in New York) uses three simple materials to produce these otherworldly works of art.

(via ithurtssomuch)

fictitiousfake:

J.K Rowling said that her inspiration for Hagrid came from when she was 19  in a pub in the west country and this terrifying looking guy came in with these other biker guys and the only thing he talked to J.K about was how his cabbages were getting on

(via fuckyeahharrypotter)

tumbledownthemountain:

mulberry-cookies:

Dolce & Gabbana S/S 2012 (Details)

❤️

tumbledownthemountain:

mulberry-cookies:

Dolce & Gabbana S/S 2012 (Details)

❤️

(via definitiveme)

todaysdocument:


"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."
-Franklin D. Roosevelt
"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945
From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

todaysdocument:

"Books cannot be killed by fire. People die, but books never die. No man and no force can put thought in a concentration camp forever. No man and no force can take from the world the books that embody man’s eternal fight against tyranny. In this war, we know, books are weapons."

-Franklin D. Roosevelt

"Books are weapons in the war of ideas", 1941 - 1945

From the series: World War II Posters, 1942 - 1945

Banned Books Week is September 21 - 27, 2014

(via definitiveme)

oh yeah, so this was a thing I got to see when in London.

oh yeah, so this was a thing I got to see when in London.